Maiara Walsh and Kelcie Stranahan in Last Hours in Suburbia (2012)

Manifesting Guilt

It's been four months since Grace (Kelcie Stranahan) was involved in an accident which lead to the death of her friend Jennifer (Maiara Walsh) and she still can't remember anything from the night other than she was found behind the wheel of the car with a blood alcohol level which was over the limit. But on her final day of freedom before she is sent inside for her part in her friend's death Grace finds herself dealing with Jennifer as she has a returned as a manifestation of her guilt, although no one else can see her. But Jennifer's return is for a purpose, beyond bugging Grace, as she leads her on an investigation, going over the night to find the truth about what happened before it is too late.

So you've done some thing really bad and your conscience starts to bug you over what you did, not allowing you to rest. That is what you get in "Last Hours in Suburbia" as Grace is plagued by her conscience and feelings of the guilt to the point she manifests her friend who like those buried memories knows what happened but has to lead Grace in to rediscovering her memories of what really happened that night. It is actually quite a smart idea because anyone who has been plagued with thoughts over some thing they have done will know how these thoughts can become increasingly real and you start believing what your mind tells you.

But whilst the idea is good "Last Hours in Suburbia" ends up becoming more of a typical TV movie as we watch Grace, led by Jennifer, going over what happened that fateful night with things coming back to her, such as remembering she wasn't driving that night despite being found behind the wheel. What it means is that Grace uncovers a cover up and of course the more she understands what really happened the more danger she puts herself in. The only thing not typical about this is the character of Jennifer as she has been written with some amusing elements from doing a "Ghost" and singing "I'm Henry the Eight I am" in one scene to mentioning "Fight Club" in another, these elements bring a smile to your face.

What this all boils down to is that "Last Hours in Suburbia" is an entertaining spin on the familiar idea of a girl with memory loss trying to piece together what happened to them. But as such there is a certain amount of familiarity to this lurking behind the creative use of a manifestation of guilt.