Jennifer Finnigan in Baby Sellers (2013)

Baby Terror

Detective Nic Morrison (Jennifer Finnigan) is part of the team trying to stop human trafficking and it is during one of their operations they stop a lorry not only carrying pregnant women and young girls but a series of babies in crates. With information connecting the babies to an exclusive adoption agency run by Carla Huxley (Kirstie Alley) Nic decides to snoop. One thing leads to another and when her partner within the HSI team is killed in a bombing which Nic is convinced is connected to Huxley, she decides to go undercover as a single woman looking to adopt a baby, but in doing do putting herself right in the firing line if her cover is blown.

I am convinced that I read that the Lifetime movie "Baby Sellers" was based on a true story. Now I don't doubt that there are huge, illegal operations going on where adoption agencies in America and other countries are doing business in stolen babies from countries such as India and across the globe. And I don't doubt for a minute that various government agencies involved in trying to stop the illegal trade in babies have gone undercover and in to other countries. But to say that "Baby Sellers" is based on a specific story seems a bit of a push to me due to how it comes across.

Kirstie Alley in Baby Sellers (2013)

What I mean is that whilst "Baby Sellers" presents us in a dramatic way with an insight into the illegal baby selling business it seems more focused on the dramatics of it. On one hand we have Jennifer Finnigan playing the determined crime fighter who puts herself in danger and then we have Kirstie Alley delivering business bitch who will kill to keep her lucrative operation running. It is all entertaining but not in the least bit believable with too much emphasis on both women being determined and tough cookies.

Having said that it has to be said that "Baby Sellers" is an above average production with several scenes filmed on location outside of the United States and out of the usual Canada locales which many made for TV movies end up being shot. If only they had decided on whether they wanted to be more factual or entertaining it could have been a much better movie and one which is more consistent.

What this all boils down to is that "Baby Sellers" is in fairness an impressive movie when you compare it to what you get in most made for TV movies. But it is let down by this strange mix of trying to be dramatically factual which doesn't work and makes it feels at odds with itself.